Deck Water Feature

  

Making bracesUsing a 2×6 I cut to the width between the two post. I laid the 2×6 on top of the post carefully aligning and marked the angles. Using a jigsaw I cut out each corner this allowed the brace to slide tightly between each post. I then made 2 additional exactly the same.

Drilling for plumbingWith the first brace in place I held the spillway in place to make sure the inlet fell in the center. Knowing the size of the tubing I then drilled a 1 1/2 inch hole.

Second braceWith the first brace now secure with hole drilled I visualized how far I wanted the overflow to be. To high left the potential to splash causing water loss and leaving the deck constantly wet. To low took away from the sound and effect. I believe I stuck around 16inch from top of trough. I secured second brace at this height. Then cut the notch out for the spillway.

Set spillwaySet spillway in notch cutout in previous step slightly tilt it forward to assist in water flow. Ising the third brace place on top to secure spillway in place with a little pressure. I then ran my tubing through the hole and connected the spillway to the pump placed in the bottom of the trough.

Test runWith everything in place and hooked up I added a little water into the trough and gave it a test run. This allowed me to make sure I had the proper size pump to feed the spillway. In my case for the 24inch spillway a 700 gallon per hour pump was plenty.

Back viewView from the back to show how simple the plumbing connections are. This will be covered using a galvanized metal for easy removal to drain water of make repairs if needed.

Close it upWith everything operating as it should I used a few fence picket boards to hide all of my plumbing. In doing so I created a cool little planter on the top although not very deep it adds a nice touch visually. Completed by staining with the deck and new railings. Electrical was ran from an existing outlet using an outdoor extension cord placed on a timer. ENJOY